Tuesday, November 20, 2007

The Great Wednesday Compare #24- Leo Tolstoy VERSUS Fyodor Dostoevsky

The winner of last week's Great Wednesday Compare (Harper Lee vs. Leo Tolstoy), with a final score of 8-7, was Leo Tolstoy.

Actually, there was a tie at first, but as I've specified in the rules before, the only time I personally get to vote is in the event of a tie. Sorry to all the Harper Lee fans, but I can't vote for an author I haven't read- yet. To Kill A Mockingbird has been nagging at me for some time now, so I promise to read it soon! (It was even the answer for tonight's final Jeopardy!)

But not only did choose Tolstoy because I've read him (just War and Peace, not Anna Karenina or any others though), I also wanted to put Russian against Russian. Hey, maybe I can even convince the Russian Reading Challenge participants to vote.

Remember, vote simply by adding your comment below, base it on whatever merit you choose, voting does not end until Tuesday at 11:59 p.m. (Nov. 27), and please spread the word!

Who's better?



18 comments:

Myrthe said...

Defintitely Tolstoy. Dostoevsky is so far the only Russian author that I really really cannot get my head around. And I did try: I've read probably about eight or nine of his works. Though I have to admit some of his shorter works were not that bad.

kookiejar said...

I've read one book from each. I liked Crime and Punishment better than Anna Karenina, so I'm going with Dostoevsky this time.

Wendy said...

Has to be Tolstoy - War and Peace is the single greatest book ever written (in my opinion of course!).

Amateur Reader said...

Tolstoy is the greater stylist (so that's my vote). Dostoevsky is the greater neurotic. They rank similarly as crackpot mystics.

Rob Hardy said...

Okay, Tolstoy. Anna Karenina evidently isn't bad if you read it the way my mother-in-law did: reading only the chapters about Kitty and Levin and skipping the chapters about Anna and Vronsky.

Barbara Bruederlin said...

Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment was responsible for me getting a really great mark in high school English.

And that's a good enough reason for me.

Chris said...

Another tough one. Tolstoy.

Dewey said...

Tolstoy!

Carrie K said...

They're not the same person? Kidding! Um, Tolstoy, if only because I was told to read Anna Karenina because she reminded the recommender of my life. (Still do not want to know why.)

Bybee said...

I am interested in reading more Dostoevsky. So Mr. D gets my vote! Tolstoy, nyet.

GeraniumCat said...

Dostoevsky - thought The Idiot was wonderful. And I'm not a Tolstoy fan.

Isabella said...

This is tough. This is Beatles vs the Stones; chocolate vs vanilla.

I'd read a handful of both (well, they're all big enough that they're hard to hold in one hand, but figuratively speaking...). Until just over a year ago, I'd've said Dostoeyesky, for being more philosophical, more self-aware, not just a story but all the asides and wonderings. But then last year I read War and Peace.

So, Tolstoy.

Ms. Place said...

Once again, Tolstoy. He's more accessible than Dostoevsky. If you pit Tolstoy against Turgenev, I'll have a problem deciding. Fathers and Sons is my all time favorite Russian novel.

John Mutford said...

Isabella: They are a couple of heavy hitters, no denying that! And let's see, since we're in a voting mood, I'll say The Stones (though up until recently I would have said the Beatles) and chocolate (though only if it's just plain old chocolate without any of that double fudge nonsense).

Ms. Place: That's good to hear. Fathers and Sons is one of my picks for the Russian Reading Challenge next year.

Literary Feline said...

This is a hard one! I loved Anna Karenina and Crime and Punishment. I think I'll have to vote for Fyodor Dostoevsky this round though.

Charlene D. said...

Having read a good bit of both, I'm voting for Dostoevsky.

He got me first since I read Crime and Punishment when I was in high school. I think Dostoevsky does a better job bringing the motivations of his characters to life. They're better fleshed out by giving the reader insight into the workings of their minds. Tolstoy's work is beautiful, but War and Peace, while truly excellent, painted in broader strokes and really lost me in places.

Nicole said...

This one's tough. I started Anna Karenina once, and couldn't get past the first chapter.

However, The Idiot had me from page one.

My vote is for Dostoevsky. Besides, his name is much more fun to say!

CHIRIG Abdelkrim said...

There is no comparison at all. Dostoevsky's psychological penetration into the human soul is amazingly incomparable. No one could ever do the same. I vote for Dostoevsky.