Friday, April 10, 2009

Nursery Rhymes- The Extended Versions


A few days ago I was reading my son's Chirp magazine and came across this version of Old Mother Hubbard:

Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To give the poor dog a bone;
But when she came there,
The cupboard was bare
And so the poor dog had none.

She went to the market
To buy him some fruit;
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat;
But when she came back
He was riding a goat.

She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat;
But when she came back
He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig;
But when she came back
He was dancing a jig.

The dame made a curtsy
The dog made a bow;
The dame said, "Your servant,"
The dog said, "Bow-wow."


I'd not heard of any of those additional verses before and while the magazine listed it as "traditional," I researched to see if they belonged to the original or not (by research I mean Wikipedia). Not only were these verses original, but there were still more missing:

She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread;
When she came back
The dog was dead!

She went to the undertaker's
To buy him a coffin;
When she came back
The dog was laughing.

She took a clean dish
to get him some tripe;
When she came back
He was smoking his pipe.

She went to the alehouse
To get him some beer;
When she came back
The dog sat in a chair.

She went to the tavern
For white wine and red;
When she came back
The dog stood on his head.

She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes;
When she came back
He was reading the news.

She went to the sempstress
To buy him some linen;
When she came back
The dog was spinning.

She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose;
When she came back
He was dressed in his clothes.

This wonderful dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight,
He could read, he could dance,
He could sing, he could write;
She gave him rich dainties
Whenever he fed,
And erected this monument
When he was dead.

It's like the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida of nursery rhymes, isn't it? No wonder they shortened it (well, that and the beer, the death, etc). It got me thinking about other nursery rhymes and their additional verses. Here's what I could find. I haven't included ones which are really just a variation on the original rather than an extension (ex. Hickory Dickory Dare). Which have you heard of?

Jack and Jill
Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got and home did trot
As fast as he could caper;
And went to bed to mend his head
With vinegar and brown paper.

Jill came in and she did grin
To see his paper plaster;
Mother vexed did whip her next
For causing Jack's disaster.

Now Jack did laugh and Jill did cry
But her tears did soon abate;
Then Jill did say that they should play
At see-saw across the gate.


London Bridge

London Bridge is falling down,
Falling down, Falling down.
London Bridge is falling down,
My fair lady.

Take a key and lock her up,
Lock her up, Lock her up.
Take a key and lock her up,
My fair lady.

How will we build it up,
Build it up, Build it up?
How will we build it up,
My fair lady?

Build it up with silver and gold,
Silver and gold, Silver and gold.
Build it up with silver and gold,
My fair lady.

Gold and silver I have none,
I have none, I have none.
Gold and silver I have none,
My fair lady.

Build it up with needles and pins,
Needles and pins, Needles and pins.
Build it up with needles and pins,
My fair lady.

Pins and needles bend and break,
Bend and break, Bend and break.
Pins and needles bend and break,
My fair lady.

Build it up with wood and clay,
Wood and clay, Wood and clay.
Build it up with wood and clay,
My fair lady.

Wood and clay will wash away,
Wash away, Wash away.
Wood and clay will wash away,
My fair lady.

Build it up with stone so strong,
Stone so strong, Stone so strong.
Build it up with stone so strong,
My fair lady.

Stone so strong will last so long,
Last so long, Last so long.
Stone so strong will last so long,
My fair lady.

Baa Baa Black Sheep
Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full.
One for the master,
One for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

Thank you said the master,
Thank you said the dame,
Thank you said the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

One to mend the jerseys,
One to mend the socks,
And one to mend the holes
In the little girl's frocks.

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky!

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark,
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark,
Lights the traveller in the dark,—
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.


Any other nursery rhyme extensions you care to share? You could always create your own...

7 comments:

Allison said...

Wow, Old Mother Hubbard is a long one. Some of the verses are pretty questionable.

I have heard the London Bridge extended on before, yet I can't recall where. Hmmm.

susanwrites said...

I had a book with that long version of Mother Hubbard in it when I was a child! Thanks for the memory.

J.S. Peyton said...

Okay, now I new that some of those old fairy tales were violent but no one told me about these nursery rhymes too!

And who knew "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" and "Jack and Jill" had more than one verse? Learn something new everyday! = )

Kelly Fineman said...

Holy cow - if Mother Hubbard was long, then London Bridge was eternity. I've seen additional verses to all three before, but not as many as you've shared here.

A few years ago there was a book out called Heavy Words Lightly Thrown: The Reason Behind the Rhymes that explains the history behind a lot of the best-known nursery rhymes. You'd probably like it, if you haven't already seen it.

Kelly said...

Very interesting...I'd heard the Mother Hubbard and Jack and Jill extensions, but never Twinkle or London Bridges. Thanks for that. I have a manuscript of parodies of nursery rhymes, so this was pretty cool!

Barbara Bruederlin said...

I've also heard some of the additional verses for Old Mother Hubbard, Jack and Jill, and London Bridge before, but nowhere near as many as you found. I think you made half of them up!

And what were you doing stealing your son's Chirp magazine?

Jo-Ann said...

Here is a second verse for I'm a little teapot -
I'm a clever teapot this is true.
Here is an example of what I can do.
I can change my handle and change my spout.
Just tip me over and pour me out.

I use this during my toddler time program at the library. I don't remember where I learned.

Here is also another version of Eensy Weensy Spider -
The big fat spider went up the water spout. Down came the rain and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain.
And the big fat spider went up the water spout again.