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Monday, November 07, 2011

Reader's Diary #774- Luigi Pirandello: War

(With no disrespect to Mr. Pirandello, I find his photo a little creepy. It's not him, it's the photography.)

With Remembrance Day coming up, I figured I'd take a moment to read a story about war, so I Googled war + short story and this one was right at the top. Which is quite good because as it turned out, I really enjoyed it.

"War" by Luigi Pirandello takes place on a train. A mother and father are off to see their son before he heads to the front. They are understandably upset, but soon they realize they are sharing a car with other parents who know exactly what they are going through. However, instead of drawing support from one another, they soon get into a heated debate about who has it worse. Itself could be a comment on the cause of wars.

Finally, one man appears to be the voice of reason. We soon see, however, that there's a time to think with the brain and a time to feel with the heart. Pirandello makes a strong case that we often get those times confused.

I quite enjoyed this story and it's quite short, so I'd recommend checking it out.

(Did you write a post for Short Story Monday? If so, please leave a link in the comments below.)

4 comments:

Medea said...

Sounds interesting, I'll check it out,

I read a short story from the Walrus this week.
http://perogiesandgyoza.blogspot.com/2011/11/short-story-monday-crow-procedure.html

Julie @ Read Handed said...

Sounds like a really interesting story. I like that the story is about war on varying levels. I did a Nathaniel Hawthorne story today - "Young Goodman Brown".

Teddy Rose said...

That does sound like a good short and perfect for Remembrance Day.

Here's mine: http://teddyrose.blogspot.com/2011/11/twelve-strangers-in-night-by-elizabeth.html

Margot said...

You sold me on this story. I'm curious how they resolve their conflict, if they do, which is probably one of the points of the story.

My story was longer - 40 pages, but still enjoyable. My review: Recalculating by Jennifer Weiner.