Monday, March 05, 2012

Reader's Diary #807- Richard Harding Davis: Somewhere in Paris


The first right of two l' short history that préécrite Monday announces me programmed to appear tandis qu' I' ; m vacationing in France, j' decided to translate them into French. Two problems:
1. My stone lessons of Rosetta go slower qu' I' ; D hoped and thus I miss of capacity
2. Even if I could translate it into French, the majority of my readers are unilingual, right? In fact, I n' have any idea why j' assume that.

In any case, I' ; m going to make next the best thing (which, in addition, is also the worst thing): I' ; m going to employ Babelfish to translate these words into French and then to again translate them in l' English. I make excuse.

I' ; the VE also decided to connect my two next posts d' short history in France, which m' bring to this week' ; history of S: " ; Some share in France" ; by Richard Harding Davis. " ; Some share in France" ; is an account with suspense d' spy, d' access published in 1915. It follows most of the time a spy called Marie Gessler (but often went by d' other names), d' Germany. It doesn' ; spy of T except d' engagement or of patriotic pride, but for l' venture. In that the last adventure, as title would suggest, Marie is in service in France, one of its on the ground frequent to strike foot. I' ; the VE read the very small fiction d' spy. John Carré' ; " of S; L' spy who entered of the cold, " ; Hubert Aquin' ; S confusing atrocious the " ; Next episode, " ; and that' ; S about it unless the cartoons of TinTin count.

What qu' it is, " ; Some share in France" ; is an interesting history, most of the time due to Marie' ; Persson isolated from S. It has l' air d' a play showing all rather the atrocities war and so much sometimes, you can almost s' enraciner for Marie. More, l' ordered torsion with l' little; end helps. But now qu' I' ; the VE said that, I' ; the VE already prepared you for something and short the risk of l' to damage. Afflicted.

(You wrote a post for l' short history Monday? If so, please leave a bond in the comments below.)

actual words:
The first of just two pre-written Short Story Monday posts I scheduled to appear while I'm vacationing in France, I decided to translate them into French. Two problems:
1. My Rosetta Stone lessons are going slower than I'd hoped and so I lack the ability
2. Even if I was able to translate it into French, most of my readers are unilingual, right? Actually, I have no idea why I assume that.

In any case, I'm going to do the next best thing (which, incidentally, is also the worst thing): I'm going to use Babelfish to translate these words into French and then to translate back into English. I apologize.

I've also decided to connect my next two Short Story Posts to France, which brings me to this week's story: "Somewhere in France" by Richard Harding Davis. "Somewhere in France" is a spy thriller, first published in 1915. It mostly follows a spy named Marie Gessler (but often went by other names), from Germany. She doesn't spy out of obligation or patriotic pride, but for adventure. In this latest adventure, as the title would suggest, Marie is on duty in France, one of her frequent stomping grounds.

I've read very little spy fiction. John le Carré's The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, Hubert Aquin's atrociously confusing Next Episode, and that's about it unless TinTin comics count.

Anyway, "Somewhere in France" is an interesting story, mostly due to Marie's detached persona. It has the air of a game rather showing any atrocities of war and so at times, you can almost root for Marie. Plus, the neat little twist at the end helps. But now that I've said that, I've already prepared you for something and run the risk of spoiling it. Sorry.

(Did you write a post for Short Story Monday? If so, please leave a link in the comments below.)

5 comments:

Julie @ Read Handed said...

The Babel Fish attempt does not seem to have worked well at all! I sincerely applaud the effort, though. Hope you are having a good time in France and haven't run into any spies. Ironically, the story I read for today is by a French writer J.M.G. Le Clézio, though I read a version translated into English: "Hazaran."

Barbara Bruederlin said...

The Babelfish translation game is a lot of fun, isn't it? I do use it to help me write my German Christmas letters, but you really have to know the language to begin with.

Have a great trip!

Margot said...

I like your two versions of today's post. Fun. Hope you are getting rest on your vacation or at least having fun.I read some of Julie's Flash Fiction and posted about it today. It is here: Joyfully Retired

Judith said...

Hi, John,
I've posted a Short Story Monday entry and had fun doing it. A short take on a Heinrich Boll masterpiece and then a story by a famous New England writer.

Thanks,
Judith (Reader in the Wilderness)

Medea said...

Oh this warms my money grubbing heart, as someone who makes half her living as a translator and interpreter. I won't be out of a job anytime soon!