Monday, March 12, 2012

Reader's Diary #808- Marguerite Duras: The Bible

C' is my 2èmes and final posts programmed préécrits to appear tandis qu' I' ; m far in France. And, like the first, always in l' spirit of my lack of French capacity, I' ; the VE l' translated into French using Babelfish, and back still in English.

He takes much d' entrails to write a short history called the " ; Bible." ; Probably. I' ; the VE expressed my preoccupations concerning this much with a time: mention the religion d' a vague manner, with the lightest council that you can have a point, and people seem to believe you. I' ; m not sour which is the case here. Marguerite Duras, l' author, had been born in Vietnam with the French parents when c' was always a colony, and again moved in France when it was 17 years old, where it remained jusqu' with its death in 1996.

C' is my first time reading n' import which part of its work, and j' found the model interesting. The sentences are short and blunt, almost like if she' ; annoyed S.A. and would obtain l' just rather; history more. In this case, he compliments the protagonist' ; prospect for S completely well, like if l' author and his character are one and the same one, even if one says to him at the 3rd person. It' ; S about d' an young woman who dates an intellectual who is rather haunted with the bible and Coran. It tires its concern quickly. If I were to guess as for what Duras tested d' to indicate, it would be this it' ; S sad not to accept the magic, but when you don' ; T, you don' ; T. Not an excessively merry piece, by all the means, and finishes to him rather anti-climatic. I' ; D must read it with several times, not only decided if my conjecture were correct. But points of allowance for the model.

(You wrote a post for l' short history Monday? If so, please leave a bond in the comments below.)

actual words:
This is my 2nd and final pre-written scheduled posts to appear while I'm away in France. And, like the first, still in the spirit of my lack of French ability, I've translated it into French using Babelfish, and back again into English.

It takes a lot of guts to write a short story called "The Bible." Possibly. I've voiced my concerns about this many times: mention religion in a vague way, with the slightest hint that you may have a point, and people seem to believe you. I'm not sure that is the case here.

Marguerite Duras, the author, was born in Vietnam to French parents when it was still a colony, and moved back to France when she was 17, where she remained until her death in 1996. This is my first time reading any of her work, and I found the style interesting. The sentences are short and blunt, almost as if she's bored and would just rather get the story over. In this case, it compliments the protagonist's perspective quite well, as if the writer and her character are one and the same, even if it is told in the 3rd person.

It's about a young woman who dates an intellectual who is rather obsessed with the Bible and the Koran. She quickly tires of his preoccupation.

If I had to guess as to what Duras was trying to say, it would be that it's sad to not believe in magic, but when you don't, you don't. Not an overly joyous piece, by any means, and it ends rather anti-climatically. I'd have to read it over a few times, not only to decided if my guess was correct. But bonus points for the style.

(Did you write a post for Short Story Monday? If so, please leave a link in the comments below.)

4 comments:

Teddy Rose said...

This doesn't sound like my cuppa but I hope your having a great time in France!

I wasn't able to post a short story review last week but I'm back. I read One that JoAnn recently recommended: http://teddyrose.blogspot.com/2012/03/farmers-children-by-elizabeth-bishop.html

Medea said...

These translations are cracking me up! Glad you are back soon though.

I read a short story about shoes this week. Much more interesting than it sounds!
http://perogiesandgyoza.blogspot.com/2012/03/short-story-monday-wind-beneath-my-feet.html

Judith said...

Keep trying with your French!

I've read some stories from a great collection, Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker, but mostly my Short Story Monday post is a sorry reflection about why I find John Updike so difficult to read.

Judith (Reader in the Wilderness)
http://readerinthewilderness.blogspot.com

Julie @ Read Handed said...

Better late than never - I finally got my short story post up. It's a baseball story by Ring Lardner called "Where Do You Get That Noise?".